PHILADELPHIA -- Trade talk mostly fizzled at the NHL draft. [url=http://www.airmax97outlet.it/]Air Max 97 Outlet Italia[/url] . "It just seemed to me there were a lot of phone calls, a lot of talking, people interested, but nothing really happened," Ottawa Senators general manager Bryan Murray said. Aside from Ryan Kesler getting dealt before proceedings got underway and then James Neal a few hours later, the weekend passed without much major action. One small trade -- the Calgary Flames getting Brandon Bollig from the Chicago Blackhawks for a third-round pick -- looked like a preview of many more to come as cap-strapped teams try to get under the US$69 million ceiling set for next season. "Its a puzzle to put together and try to make all the numbers work," Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman said Saturday. "Thats clearly the biggest factor youre faced with when you have salary cap being what it is. Youre going to have some tough decisions. Were not the only team thats in that position. There will be other teams that face the same things." Without naming names, Bowman was describing the plight of the Boston Bruins and Philadelphia Flyers, along with his Blackhawks, who almost certainly have to make sacrifices just to be cap-compliant. In the Bruins case, it might mean saying goodbye to Jarome Iginla, a 61-point player and a major piece of their Presidents Trophy-winning season. "If we cant sign Jarome, were going to find a good player at that position," Bruins GM Peter Chiarelli said Friday night. "We feel all our young guys and our current players are going to get better." Its unclear what else the Bruins might have to do with forwards Reilly Smith, Jordan Caron and Justin Florek and defenceman Torrey Krug and Matt Bartkowski needing new deals as restricted free agents. According to CapGeek, Boston has just over $1.6 million to spend. The Flyers, technically over the cap by a couple hundred thousand dollars, have some room with defenceman Chris Pronger bound for long-term injured reserve. But theyre still reportedly shopping Vincent Lecavalier to rid themselves of at least part of his $4.5 million cap hit for the next four seasons. Chicago managed to part with Bolligs $1.25-million cap hit but might have to clear more salary to fill out the roster. Enter the likes of the Flames, Edmonton Oilers and Buffalo Sabres, teams with salary-cap space to take on salary. Oilers GM Craig MacTavish knows players wont be given away, but talent should be available. "Were in a pretty enviable position to be able to take on some of those contracts," MacTavish said Friday night. "Those are really the style of deals that weve looked to make over the last little while where we give up a few assets, take the contract and the cap space, so well be trying to do some of that." That was part of what went into the Flames trading for Bollig, who just signed a contract extension in March. When the cap was set at $69 million, it was at least $1 million, if not more, less than GMs were hoping for. "Weve been looking at situations with the cap where people that may have difficulty or be in a situation where they had to move money," Flames GM Brad Treliving said. Sabres GM Tim Murray implied that hed be willing to accept expensive contracts, but only if he gets an asset like a draft pick in return. "I tried to make a big trade today, a unique trade," Murray said Saturday. "I said, We got to do like the NBA. So I went to a team and said, You trade me your first pick from yesterday. He didnt want to be the first guy to do that. So Im not sure I did, either. But I thought it was a good idea." There could be a market for those NBA-style deals if GMs determine the cap space gained is worth it. More likely, teams up against the $69 million limit will be getting partial value on current players to clear room to manoeuvre when unrestricted free agency opens Tuesday. Plenty of money will get handed out then, and the teams that dont have the space to do it will be forced to rely on younger players to fill the void. Bowman, who has gone through this during two Stanley Cup runs, called it just the continuation of the development cycle. "Its a constant process of finding guys who will be able to fill those roles," he said. "Its a never-ending game. Thats the state of the game today. But you have to find players, whether theyre free agents or like today draft picks and work with making it to the point where they can be NHL contributors." [url=http://www.airmax97outlet.it/]Air Max 97 Prezzi Bassi Italia[/url] . The question is how many minutes will be available to them and can any of their defence or goaltending provide value? Top Picks: Following a down year in 2011-2012, Matt Duchene rebounded with his highest points-per-game (0. [url=http://www.airmax97outlet.it/scontate-air-max-97-ul-17-prm.html]Air Max 97 UL 17 PRM[/url] . Malone will become an unrestricted free-agent and as per the collective bargaining agreement, the Lightning will be responsible for two-thirds of the remainder of his contract over twice the length of the rest of the deal. [url=http://www.airmax97outlet.it/scontate-air-max-97-safety-orange.html]http://www.airmax97outlet.it/scontate-air-max-97-safety-orange.html[/url] . -- The Vancouver Whitecaps remained unbeaten with a scoreless draw at the New England Revolution on Saturday.NEW YORK -- Alex Rodriguez ended his extended and acrimonious fight with Major League Baseball on Friday, withdrawing a pair of lawsuits and accepting a season-long suspension that marks the longest penalty in the sports history related to performance-enhancing drugs. Rodriguez, who has steadfastly denied using banned substances while with the New York Yankees, made the decision nearly four weeks after arbitrator Fredric Horowitz largely upheld the discipline issued last summer by baseball Commissioner Bud Selig. "I think its a good move for him," former Commissioner Fay Vincent said. "A-Rod had no chance legally, and the commissioner got his authority validated." Rodriguez was among 14 players suspended last summer following MLBs investigation of a Florida anti-aging clinic accused of distributing banned substances. Given the harshest punishment, A-Rod was the only player to contest his penalty. The Major League Baseball Players Association filed a grievance, arguing Rodriguezs 211-game ban was unwarranted or at the very least excessive. Rodriguez also sued MLB and Selig in October, accusing them of "vigilante justice" as part of a "witch hunt" against him. Horowitz presided over 12 days of hearings last fall highlighted by Rodriguezs decision not to testify. Horowitz concluded on Jan. 11 there was "clear and convincing evidence" Rodriguez used three banned substances over the course of three years -- human growth hormone, testosterone and Insulin-like growth factor 1. Horowitz also ruled A-Rod twice tried to obstruct baseballs investigation, but he nonetheless reduced the suspension to 162 games plus the 2014 post-season after weighing it against baseballs "just cause" standard. Rodriguez sued MLB and the union two days later in federal court in Manhattan, claiming the arbitration process was flawed. But the Supreme Court has established narrow grounds for overturning arbitrators decisions, and legal experts said Rodriguez had virtually no chance of succeeding in his attempt to have Horowitzs decision vacated. Without making any admissions, Rodriguezs lawyers filed notices of dismissal in both cases Friday. MLB issued a low-key statement calling the decision to end the litigation "prudent." "We believe that Mr. Rodriguezs actions show his desire to return the focus to the play of our great game on the field and to all of the positive attributes and actions of his fellow major league players," the sport said. "We share that desire." Rodriguez had angered many of his fellow players by suing his own union in an attempt to avoid a suspension. Withdrawing the lawsuits was perhaps the start of mending relationnships with fellow players. [url=http://www.airmax97outlet.it/scontate-air-max-97-ultra.html]Air Max 97 Ultra outlet[/url]. "Alex Rodriguez has done the right thing by withdrawing his lawsuit," the union said in a statement. "His decision to move forward is in everyones best interest." Rodriguez in 2009 admitted he used banned substances from 2001-03 while with Texas, before baseball had penalties in place for PEDs. After MLBs investigation was sparked 13 months ago by a report in Miami New Times, Rodriguez repeatedly said he had not failed any drug test and claimed evidence provided to MLB by Anthony Bosch, founder of the Biogenesis of America clinic, was not trustworthy. When Horowitz issued his decision, the three-time AL MVP defiantly proclaimed, "No player should have to go through what I have been dealing with." He announced, "I am exhausting all options to ensure not only that I get justice, but that players contracts and rights are protected." But a few hours after the Arizona Diamondbacks became the first team this year to start spring training workouts, and with the Yankees a week from opening camp, Rodriguez folded quietly. He was in Miami on Friday and made no public remarks. "The statements that were issued say everything that needs to be said. We have no further comments on this matter," Joseph Tacopina, one of Rodriguezs nine attorneys, said in an email. Tacopina said Rodriguez no longer intended to report this month to the Yankees training camp in Tampa, Fla. Suspensions only cover regular-season games and the post-season, with exhibitions specifically exempted. Rodriguez will lose most of his $25 million salary -- Horowitz ruled he is entitled to 21-183rds, which comes to $2,868,852.46. The third baseman will be 39 when he is eligible to return in a year, and he has incentive to play during the final three seasons of his contract. The Yankees owe him $21 million in 2015 and $20 million in each of the final two seasons of the record $275 million, 10-year deal. But the 14-time All-Star has been hobbled by injuries in recent years and has not played a full season since 2007. The timing of Rodriguezs decision was set in motion by U.S. District Judge Edgardo Ramos, who on Jan. 30 told the players lawyers to respond by Friday to arguments from MLB and the union that the case should be dismissed. Rodriguez does have one lawsuit remaining. He sued Yankees physician Dr. Christopher Ahmad and New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York State Supreme Court in October, claiming they mishandled his medical care during the 2012 AL playoffs. Rodriguez later was diagnosed with a hip injury that required surgery and did not return to the Yankees until Aug. 5 -- hours after his suspension was announced by Selig. ' ' '